Lance Roberts

About the Author Lance Roberts

As an active portfolio manager for STA Wealth Management, Lance's primary role is to question the mainstream mantra. Rather than just regurgitating the news of the day, Lance looks at the “raw data” to bring a unique and “un-spun” perspective to the conversation. Lance's deep understanding of fundamental, technical and economic perspectives, combined with his unique focus, helps listeners understand how it impacts their family, their money and their life. "When a portfolio is fully invested, studying the reasons why the market will continue to rise is a bit pointless. As investors, we need to temper our bullish perspective with contradictory arguments to reduce 'confirmation bias.' If our job as investors is to 'buy low and sell high' we need analysis that helps us to identify those points." After having been in the investing world for more than 25 years from private banking and investment management to private and venture capital; Lance has pretty much "been there and done that" at one point or another. His common sense approach, clear explanations and “real world” experience has appealed to audiences for over a decade. Lance is also the Chief Editor of the X-Report, a weekly subscriber based-newsletter that is distributed nationwide. The newsletter covers economic, political and market topics as they relate to your money and life. He is also writes a daily blog which is read by thousands nationwide from individuals to professionals, and his opinions are frequently sought after by major media sources. Lance’s investment strategies and knowledge have been featured on CNBC, Fox Business News, Business News Network and Fox News. He has been quoted by a litany of publications from the Wall Street Journal, Reuters, Bloomberg, The New York Times, The Washington Post all the way to TheStreet.com. His writings and research have also been featured on several of the nation's biggest financial blog sites such as the Pragmatic Capitalist, Credit Writedowns, The Daily Beast, Zero Hedge and Seeking Alpha.

5 Biggest Investing Myths

1) The Market Has Generated 10% Annual Returns

  • Benjamin Graham – also known as The Dean of Wall Street and The Father of Value Investing – was a scholar and financial analyst who mentored legendary investors such as Warren Buffett, William J. Ruane, Irving Kahn and Walter J. Schloss.

    Warren Buffett once gave a speech at Columbia Business School explaining how Graham’s record of creating exceptional investors (such as Buffett himself) is unquestionable, and how Graham’s principles are everlasting. The speech is now known as “The Superinvestors of Graham-and-Doddsville”.

    Buffett describes Graham’s book – The Intelligent Investor – as “by far the best book about investing ever written” (in its preface).

    Graham’s first recommended strategy – for casual investors – was to invest in Index stocks.
    For more serious investors, Graham recommended three different categories of stocks – Defensive, Enterprising and NCAV – and 17 qualitative and quantitative rules for identifying them.
    For advanced investors, Graham described various special situations or “workouts”.

    The first requires almost no analysis, and is easily accomplished today with a good S&P500 Index fund.
    The last requires more than the average level of ability and experience. Such stocks are also not amenable to impartial algorithmic analysis, and require a case-specific approach.

    But Defensive, Enterprising and NCAV stocks can be reliably detected by today’s data-mining software, and offer a great avenue for accurate automated analysis and profitable investment.

  • Dave

    It’s no secret that mutual fund managers in recent times have not been able to beat the benchmarks, but that has nothing to do with whether or not the individual investor can beat them. Mutual funds as we know them reward mediocrity and punish risk-taking, and there are many other systemic reasons why fund managers do not beat the indexes with any consistency. However individuals have none of the same restrictions of mutual funds and can easily beat the market over a long period of time if they keep investing in stocks that outperform the market. Contrary to what this author says, he is himself repeating a myth. There is simply no reason why one cannot beat the S&P 500 index for example, and the linked article does not provide one.